Syrinx Effect returns to Rainshadow Recording

Duo showcases broad range of experimentation

Posted 11/6/19

As the self-proclaimed “interstellar folk punk jazz” duo of Syrinx Effect approaches its first full decade of partnership, they’re returning to the Rainshadow Recording Studio for a performance on Nov. 12.

“It’s a really cool room, a very intimate space,” said trombonist Naomi Siegel, who partners with saxophonist Kate Olson to perform as Syrinx Effect. “Everett Moran does a great job of running the place.”

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Syrinx Effect returns to Rainshadow Recording

Duo showcases broad range of experimentation

Posted

As the self-proclaimed “interstellar folk punk jazz” duo of Syrinx Effect approaches its first full decade of partnership, they’re returning to the Rainshadow Recording Studio for a performance on Nov. 12.

“It’s a really cool room, a very intimate space,” said trombonist Naomi Siegel, who partners with saxophonist Kate Olson to perform as Syrinx Effect. “Everett Moran does a great job of running the place.”

Although Siegel and Olson started out both living in the Seattle area, Siegel’s move to Missoula, Montana means that performances of Syrinx Effect often feel like reunion tours, even though the band is still together.

And yet, Siegel said that she and Olson perform together as well as ever, perhaps because their greatest strength as a musical duo has always been their broad range.

“We chose the name ‘syrinx’ because it refers to the larynx of a bird that can warble at a high and low pitch at the same time,” Siegel said. “That’s certainly what you get when you pair off a trombone with a soprano saxophone.”

Siegel and Olson originally came together by partnering on experimental improvisations, and Siegel believes that partnership succeeded largely due to their shared commitment to “big listening.”

“You’re both responding to whatever happens in the moment, and you’re mindful of what’s happening with the improvisations,” Siegel said. “You’re both really listening to what the other person is doing.”

As Syrinx Effect has honed its collective craft, both Siegel and Olson have incorporated pre-composed pieces into their improvisations, which is where Siegel cited the additional strength of her and Olson’s contrasting musical backgrounds.

“We each have our own individual influences, and we can inspire each other,” Siegel said. “Some experimental groups can be so strict about not sounding consonant. We’re committed to improvisation and cherish chaos, but we don’t cut ourselves off from potential sounds by insisting we have to be dissonant. A lot of our material is actually based in simple folk melodies.”

For all these reasons, Siegel advised audiences that no two performances by Syrinx Effect ever sound entirely the same.

“Every time we play, we’re riding the edge of the moment and creating in real time,” Siegel said. “Although we consider our sound to be largely folk, it’s not a typical folk American show. You’re not getting guitars. We don’t limit ourselves in that way. Kate started out using guitar pedals, but now she uses a laptop.”

Even as both Siegel and Olson have branched out to lead bands of their own, their other work as musicians has continued to feed into the mix of Syrinx Effect.

“We struck a natural balance and developed a deep foundation for our partnership,” Siegel said. “When we perform together, it’s intuitive and fun.”

Syrinx Effect’s Nov. 12 performance at Rainshadow Recording Studio starts at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets are available at syrinx.brownpapertickets.com.

For further details, contact 360-301-0291 or centrumrecording@gmail.com.

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