Special program supports Brian Goodman photo exhibit

Leader news staff
news@ptleader.com
Posted 11/20/20

In conjunction with the new book and corresponding show of Port Townsend photographer Brian Goodman’s images of the Manzanar internment camp at the Northwind Arts Center, the Northwind Reading …

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Special program supports Brian Goodman photo exhibit

In conjunction with the new book and corresponding show of Port Townsend photographer Brian Goodman’s images of the Manzanar internment camp at the Northwind Arts center, the Northwind Reading Series recently presented videos of Sharon Hashimoto and Lawrence Matsuda (above) reading their work.
In conjunction with the new book and corresponding show of Port Townsend photographer Brian Goodman’s images of the Manzanar internment camp at the Northwind Arts center, the Northwind Reading Series recently presented videos of Sharon Hashimoto and Lawrence Matsuda (above) reading their work.
Images courtesy of Sharon Carter
Posted

In conjunction with the new book and corresponding show of Port Townsend photographer Brian Goodman’s images of the Manzanar internment camp at the Northwind Arts Center, the Northwind Reading Series recently presented videos of two poets of Japanese-American heritage reading their work.

The featured writers are Sharon Hashimoto and Lawrence Matsuda. The videos can be viewed now at ww.northwindarts.org  or the Northwind Arts Facebook page, as well as the Northwind Readings Facebook page.

Hashimoto is a lifelong resident of Washington state, a poet and fiction writer. She is a Sansei (third-generation Japanese-American) with paternal ties to Hawaii. 

She was a William Raney Scholar for poetry at the Bread Loaf Writers Conference, and her poems and stories have appeared in Shenandoah, North American Review, Tampa Review, Crab Orchard Review, POETRY, and others.In 1990, Hashimoto was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts in poetry and is currently at work on a novel.

Matsuda was born in the Minidoka, Idaho concentration camp during World War II. He and his family were among the approximately 120,000 Japanese incarcerated.  

In 2010, his book of poetry “A Cold Wind from Idaho,” about the forced incarceration of Japanese Americans, was published by Black Lawrence Press. 

Matsuda’s book “Glimpses of a Forever Foreigner,” a collaboration between the poet and artist Roger Shimomura, who contributed 17 original sketches, was released in 2014. In 2019 Matsuda completed a novel based on his mother’s experience entitled, “My Name Is Not Viola.”

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